Saturday, January 10, 2009

No Good Deed

So I took Castor to the vet yesterday in hopes that something could be done about his stomach and bowel issues. The steroid injections were no longer helping and it was time to try something different. However, there is a reason the steroids were injected. When someone tries to pill this cat he turns into a miniature deforestation-machine from the deepest corners of Hell...

His first dose of the two (not one, but 2!) new pills were administered by the vet yesterday morning. I had to grin like an idiot because she actually got to experience the foaming, struggling reaction that I have become accustomed to. I also smiled because neither the vet nor her assistant were injured in the process of pilling him. Always preferable. Have I mentioned that these pills must be given twice a day? No? Well yeah...

So last night with FH's help I managed to get the pills into his mouth. They dissolved rapidly into the "beard of spit" that I mentioned before. Our lovely vet suggested an alternative to the solid pills; crush them and melt them in warm water. Thus enabling them to be squirted into kitty's mouth and harder to reject. Hmm...

So I decided this morning that I would give that a go. FH got out of the warm bed where he was sprawling and helped hold Castor. We didn't even get through the main syringe of water+pill dust when a front foot got loose from the towel and tore into the index finger of my left hand. It actually sunk in deeply and ripped. And his pill-foam nastiness went into the wound. Less than pleasant. Being bitten through an artery was much nicer; cleaner too.

I know I haven't mentioned the list of antibiotics and other drugs that I am either allergic to or have sensitivities to. It's a long list. I had to call the vet and determine what families his pills are in so I could call my pharmacy and have them compare my list with his drugs. Fortunately according to my pharmacist, I only have to worry about the bacterial grossness that live around kitty feet infecting my wound and not an allergic reaction on top of it all.

That being dealt with I finished flushing said wound with water, soap, and alcohol. I then kept pressure on it with a sterile bit of non-adhesive cotton, dug out the Bactine with aloe and some wonderful numbing agent, and bandaged myself up. FH took Castor to the vet's so they could finish the pilling for the day. If I know him, he's going to beg them for drugs that will do the same that are injectable.

Later tonight Castor's getting a pedicure. I'm going to be busy hoping I don't react to the bandage adhesive or develop an infection in the wound. I'm really getting tired of being allergic to everything. Ugh.

7 comments:

Alice said...

Ow, ow, ow! Watch that wound. Cat scratches can be nasty.

Have you tried a pill popper for Castor? The last time we had to medicate Pooh, it was quite a battle, then a friend recommended a pill popper so we found one at the pet store. Using the pill dispenser was less stressful for Pooh and for us.

MiniKat said...

Tried it the night before. Also tried mixing crushed pills into wet food.

Karen B. said...

Sorry for the unpleasant situation. How long do you have to go through the medicating process? Explain the name Castor?

Miz Minka said...

I don't think there's anything worse than having to give a cat a pill. :(

TigereyeSal said...

Have you considered pill pockets and/or hydrolyzed protein diets? We have had great success with each of these in our practice. Steroids also can be given transdermally, if need be.

MiniKat said...

We just took him off steroids. He had been on them too long. He's allergic to the ingredients in the pill pockets, not to mention once he bit through one the bitterness of the two pills would make him foam. His diet is already mostly protein.

TigereyeSal said...

I hope that I haven't come on too strong with my suggestions. I found your site from Michelle at Boulderneigh (I think), and was immediately enchanted with your furry family.

Because I have a bit of an insider's view as far as feline medicine goes, I am in danger of spouting advice at the slightest provocation.

Sometimes, particular diets work for very sensitive cats. These diets make use of reconfigured protein molecules, making the proteins "invisible" to the immune system. The reconfigured proteins are "hydrolyzed" to change their structure.

Essential Fatty Acids have also been found to be helpful in reducing inflammation and calming immune system hypersensitivity.

Castor's case sounds very challenging, but he seems to have the perfect family situation to keep him happy and loved.